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Floating market THE FLOATING MARKET
Each morning dozens of Venezuelan schooners and sailboats arrive laden with fresh tropical fruits, vegetables, spices and fish. Colorful canopies and a bustling atmosphere make this a fun place to visit.

MIKVE ISRAEL-EMANUEL SYNAGOGUE
This synagogue was founded in 1651 by twelve Jewish families from Amsterdam. It's the oldest temple still in use in the Western Hemisphere. A thick carpet of sand on the floor symbolizes the desert where the Israelites caped on their long journey to freedom. It may also recall God's promise to Abraham that his descendants would be "as countless as the sands of the sea". More practically, it muffles the sound of footsteps during services.

HATO CAVES
Check the amazing carvings from the beginning of time in the Hato Caves. Limestone caverns, underwater ponds, a place too incredible to describe awaits you here. This is the spot where runaway slaves used to hide and it was also known as a popular haunt to perform ancient religious ceremonies.

CHRISTOFFEL PARK
Christoffel Park is a 4,500 acres natural preserve hosting an amazing array of flora and fauna, including species that can't be found anywhere else in the world. This preserve is located at the northwestern end of Curaçao around the island's highest point, Mount Christoffel.

THE SEAQUARIUM
The Curaçao Seaquarium presents a unique aquarium with more than 400 species of fish, sharks, crabs, lobsters, turtles, sponges and corals in their natural surroundings. All those species can be found on the reefs surrounding Curaçao.

THE FORTS
Fort Amsterdam, Fort Beekenburg, Fort Nassau, Riffort, Fort Waakzaamheid & Waterfort have guarded Curacao's harbor for centuries and are all worth a visit. Fort Amsterdam is currently the central seat of government for the Netherlands Antilles.

THE SWINGING LADY
The Queen Emma Pontoon Bridge is the world's largest floating pedestrian bridge. Built in 1888 by an American consul, a toll was charged to help recoup the costs. However, the consul decided to charge only those who could afford shoes. The idea was that people who could afford shoes were rich and people who couldn't afford shoes were poor. His good intentions backfired when he realized that the poor folks were to proud to admit their poverty and often borrowed shoes to cross, and the rich folks, too stingy to pay the toll, were often crossing barefoot. There is no charge today regardless of your footwear. The bridge is 700 ft. long and swings open up to 30 times a day to receive ships into St. Anna Bay. Locals refer to it simply as "the Swinging Lady".

Copyright © 1999, Farley Pietersz. All Rights Reserved.